This Is What Happens to Your Brain on Opioids | Short Film Showcase

This Is What Happens to Your Brain on Opioids | Short Film Showcase

Driven by opioid addiction, drug overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.
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Opioids are part of a drug class that includes the illegal drug heroin and powerful pain relievers such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl, and many others. In 2015, more than 33,000 people died from overdoses involving opioids. Every day in the United States more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for not using prescription opioids as directed.

Lily Fang’s animation, Susan’s Brain, is part of a free online course produced by HarvardX and Harvard Health Publications. The course, The Opioid Crisis in America, challenges preconceptions about addiction and about who can become addicted to opioids, and this animation illustrates changes in the brain that lead to addiction. Dr. Elena Chartoff and Dr. Hilary Connery, both of Boston’s McLean Hospital advised on the brain science within this animation. This video is provided courtesy of the President’s and Fellows of Harvard College © 2017.

Read more on the topic in the “Science of Addiction” issue of National Geographic magazine: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/science-of-addiction/

Lily Fang: http://lilyfang.com/
https://www.health.harvard.edu/
Driven by opioid addiction, drug overdose is now the leading cause of accidental death in the United States.

Opioids are part of a drug class that includes the illegal drug heroin and powerful pain relievers such as oxycodone, hydrocodone, codeine, morphine, fentanyl, and many others. In 2015, more than 33,000 people died from overdoses involving opioids. Every day in the United States more than 1,000 people are treated in emergency departments for not using prescription opioids as directed.

Lily Fang’s animation, Susan’s Brain, is part of a free online course produced by HarvardX and Harvard Health Publications. The course, The Opioid Crisis in America, challenges preconceptions about addiction and about who can become addicted to opioids, and this animation illustrates changes in the brain that lead to addiction. Dr. Elena Chartoff and Dr. Hilary Connery, both of Boston’s McLean Hospital advised on the brain science within this animation. This video is provided courtesy of the President’s and Fellows of Harvard College © 2017.

Read more on the subject in the “Science of Addiction” issue of National Geographic magazine: https://www.nationalgeographic.com/magazine/2017/09/science-of-addiction/

Lily Fang: http://lilyfang.com/

Harvard Health Publications: https://www.health.harvard.edu/

The Opioid Crisis in America: https://www.edx.org/course/opioid-crisis-america-harvardx-hhp100

Dr. Elena Chartoff : http://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/elena-chartoff

Dr. Hilary Connery: http://www.mcleanhospital.org/biography/hilary-connery

This Is What Happens to Your Brain on Opioids | Short Film Showcase

National Geographic
https://www.youtube.com/natgeo

50 replies
  1. Michelle Regis
    Michelle Regis says:

    With help from groups and medications that over time mess up her liver and kidneys, and soften her brain thus turning into a drooling idiot, she will be able to enjoy riding her bike again, ……. or a battery operated buggy.

    Reply
  2. Tarded Turd
    Tarded Turd says:

    Dopamine doesn’t feel good. Endorphines, serotonin and oxitoxin feels good. Dopamine helps the brain remember what triggered the release of the feel-good neurotransmitters. It’s the reason you eat and drink. When you eat your brain releases the feel-good neurotransmitters. The dopamine makes the brain remember that, so that you’ll eat again and not starve. It’s for the same reason dopamine makes you addicted to drugs and even sugar. It’s not because it feels good, but because your brain *remembers* that it feels good.

    Reply
  3. The Beast
    The Beast says:

    10 years in now. It went from prescription painkillers to heroin and now I’m on 85mg/day of methadone and at least 200mg/day of heroin so … great.

    Reply
  4. alaoui abdou
    alaoui abdou says:

    So opioid is just another kind of addictive drugs which was provided intelligently to patients,this is as far as I see it . another pharmaceutical industry scheme.

    Reply
  5. Dogma
    Dogma says:

    The moral of the story is… if 1 drug is absent and tolerated just switch to a new drug to counter it. Repeat cycle as prescribed… I don’t know I’m not science

    Reply
  6. Putrid Bone
    Putrid Bone says:

    Suboxone is a partial agonist—methadone is a full agonist—methadone will give you way more pain control and addiction control then suboxone—suboxone isn’t better then methadone it’s not even on same playing field…

    Reply
  7. Jamie Reid
    Jamie Reid says:

    This is wildly inaccurate.

    Opioid medicines are absolutely brilliant tablets.
    When used correctly they can be a source of genuine relief, and not just the ‘high’ feeling!

    Many doctors and people don’t realise how much pain can affect someone. Pain can put a complete hold on your entire life.
    So pain meds – again used correctly – are a great way of helping people.

    It’s unfortunate that some abuse these tablets. However, doctors are now being put under extreme pressure not to prescribe them. Which is literally killing people who genuinely need them.

    They should not be demonised.

    Reply
  8. Nicole Marie 303
    Nicole Marie 303 says:

    I’ve been in Suboxon for 5yrs and I really like how well it works and has definitely helped change my life in a real positive way, and help take away the feeling of hopelessness.. I used to think I could never get off pill, and I was so ashamed that I needed them. But now I really wish I could get off of the meds.. for one they’re not cheap at all if you don’t have Medicaid, for two I feel fine when I’m on it but after a couple of days of not being on it I start getting the horrible skin crawling felling and I can’t stand it .. I have weened myself down from when I started at 3 strips a day and now I’m down to 1/3 a strip a day.. I just can’t seem to get off it completely 🤷🏻‍♀️

    Reply
  9. Rick Daniel
    Rick Daniel says:

    Ohhhh yeah, with the help of even more medication, there’s HOPE Susan will be able to live a NORMAL life again!!! Come-on people, what lies mixed with truth BS is this??

    Reply
  10. Einar Formica
    Einar Formica says:

    Broke my leg four days ago. Now I’m on morphine all day and I hate it, I’m tired of being tired all day long…

    Reply
  11. Francis Mausley
    Francis Mausley says:

    If possible, patients should seek alternative treatment & doctors. "Treat disease through diet by preference, refraining from the use of drugs; and if you find what is required in a single herb, do not resort to a compounded medicament." ~ Baha’i Faith

    Reply
  12. disturbed1gamerz
    disturbed1gamerz says:

    You gotta have a weak mind to get addicted. I’ve been on hydros several times in my life. Never did i get addicted because i just simply stopped and went through the pain. You cant just live life on pain killers because it hurts

    Reply
  13. Jamie Reid
    Jamie Reid says:

    Less that 1% of people who don’t have an addiction history who are prescribed opioid painkillers go on to have an addiction to them.

    So the vast majority of people on opioid painkillers will ever become addicted.

    Reply
  14. WizardKing
    WizardKing says:

    I have been on prescription Oxycontin for seven years for non-cancer chronic pain. I do not abuse this drug, but I do take it daily at the maximum dose my Doctor can prescribe. I need this drug to live a normal life.

    Until you have been in such unbearable 24/7 pain that you cannot sleep, eat, walk, sit, ride in a car, you have no idea what a desperate person will do for relief. Even if is only for an hour of relief a day, you will beg, plead, for someone to HELP you relieve your agony.

    Reply
  15. Arthur Mario
    Arthur Mario says:

    well, now that Susan has recovered and rides her bike for pleasure, she should be very careful not to break her arm again!

    not really funny, but life can be so hard that you must laugh to avoid crying!

    Reply
  16. Richard Conner
    Richard Conner says:

    THERE ARE DRUGS CALLED OPIOID BLOCKERS THAT SHORTCIRCUIT THE BRAINS RUSH-REACTION TO ALCOHOL OR OPIOID,S.WHY THESE DRUGS ARE NOT PRESCRIBED TO PEOPLE TRYING TO BREAK ADDICTIONS TO THESE SUBSTANCES IS A QUESTION THAT NEEDS TO BE ASKED.

    Reply
  17. Orlando1130
    Orlando1130 says:

    I was on 100 fentanyl and 40 mg of Percocet a day. I transitioned from all that to subpoxen to nothing in a matter of 3 weeks . In the end it felt like very light flu sxs over 2 days . Subpoxen is not made to be taken over long period of times .

    In the end though I believe life is too short to live normal , want to have a good time fine but be aware of the consequences . I feel bad for people that get placed on this type of medicine without knowing the long term effects . I spend 10 years with nothing but smiles to end it with 2 days of flu sxs and maybe 2 weeks of being irritable . Now it is all in my past now .

    Reply

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